Difference between revisions of "V-wheel and Idler Assembly Instructions"

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(Created page with "== V-wheel assembly == File:EShapeOko_assembly_step_01_V-wheel_1.png {| class="wikitable" |- !Item !Part Number !Part Description !Count |- !cols...")
 
 
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== V-wheel assembly ==
 
== V-wheel assembly ==
  
[[File:EShapeOko_assembly_step_01_V-wheel_1.png]]
+
{{Dual-bearing V-wheel Assembly}}
  
{| class="wikitable"
+
== Smooth belt idler wheel assembly ==
  |-
+
    !Item
+
    !Part Number
+
    !Part Description
+
    !Count
+
  |-
+
    !colspan="4"|''For each wheel''
+
  |-
+
    |1
+
    |EM-MW1
+
    |V-wheel sleeve
+
    |1
+
  |-
+
    |2
+
    |EM-G5
+
    |5 x 16 x 5mm bearing
+
    |2
+
  |-
+
    |3
+
    |EM-W5P
+
    |5mm precision washer
+
    |1
+
|}
+
  
Lay one bearing on a flat surface. Push a V-wheel sleeve over it.
+
{{Smooth Idler Wheel Assembly}}
The parts are designed to force-fit, so push firmly straight down.
+
Thread this on a long M5 bolt, bearing side first, followed by a
+
precision washer and the second bearing.  Place the second bearing
+
on a flat surface, and push the V-wheel sleeve over it too.  Make
+
sure both bearings are in as far as they will go.  Remove the bolt.
+
 
+
[[File:EShapeOko_assembly_step_01_V-wheel_2.png]]
+
  
 
== Troubleshooting ==
 
== Troubleshooting ==
  
If the V-wheel does not rotate smoothly when mounted on a bolt and
+
If the V-wheel or idler wheel does not rotate smoothly when mounted
tightened, it is very likely that a washer (or the internal shim
+
on a bolt and tightened, it is very likely that a washer (or the
washer) is rubbing against a bearing seal.
+
internal shim washer) is rubbing against a bearing shield.
  
 
To prevent the outer washers from rubbing, always install them with
 
To prevent the outer washers from rubbing, always install them with
Line 47: Line 17:
 
away from it.
 
away from it.
  
If it's the internal washer that's rubbing against the shields of the
+
If it's the old-style internal washer that's rubbing against the shields of the
bearings, disassemble the V-wheel and examine the bearings carefully.
+
bearings, or the outer shield protrudes too much and rubs even
 +
against the convex face of a washer, disassemble the V-wheel and
 +
examine the bearings carefully.
 
Of the two shields on each bearing, identify the one that is recessed
 
Of the two shields on each bearing, identify the one that is recessed
the least, and remove it.  Install the bearings with the
+
the ''least'', and remove it.  Install the bearings with the
 
open side toward the middle of the V-wheel; the shields aren't needed
 
open side toward the middle of the V-wheel; the shields aren't needed
 
inside the V-wheel.  This should eliminate the possibility of the shim
 
inside the V-wheel.  This should eliminate the possibility of the shim
washer rubbing against the bearing.
+
washer rubbing against the bearing seal or shield.
 +
 
 +
With 625-2RS bearings (the ones with rubber seals), removing
 +
one seal is the best option. If you have 625ZZ bearings (the
 +
ones with metal shields), you can also remove one shield, or you can
 +
try to gently push the shields in, to deform them just enough that
 +
they no longer touch the washers.  Don't overdo it, or the shields will
 +
touch the innards of the bearing (the ball cage) and make things worse.
 +
 
 +
Note that the above information pertains only to the old internal
 +
washers. The new precision washers are purposely made with an outer
 +
diameter small enough not to rub against a bearing shield or seal, so
 +
the need to remove or bend shields should not arise. The new washers
 +
are also much more precisely manufactured.
  
 
If the wheel makes a crunching noise when turning, you may have
 
If the wheel makes a crunching noise when turning, you may have
 
encountered a defective bearing.
 
encountered a defective bearing.
 
== Smooth idler wheel assembly ==
 
 
[[File:EShapeOko_assembly_step_02_idler_wheel_1.png]]
 
 
{| class="wikitable"
 
  |-
 
    !Item
 
    !Part Number
 
    !Part Description
 
    !Count
 
  |-
 
    !colspan="4"|''For each wheel''
 
  |-
 
    |1
 
    |EM-MW2
 
    |Smooth idler wheel sleeve
 
    |1
 
  |-
 
    |2
 
    |EM-G5
 
    |5 x 16 x 5mm bearing
 
    |2
 
  |-
 
    |3
 
    |EM-W5P
 
    |5mm precision washer
 
    |1
 
|}
 
 
Lay one bearing on a flat surface. Push an idler wheel sleeve over it
 
(lip up, of course).  The parts are designed to force-fit, so push
 
firmly straight down.  Thread this on a long M5 bolt, lip side first,
 
followed by a precision washer and the second bearing.  Place the
 
second bearing on a flat surface, and push the idler wheel sleeve over
 
it too.  Make sure the bearings are all the way in, with the first
 
bearing resting against the lip of the sleeve.  Remove the bolt.
 
 
[[File:EShapeOko_assembly_step_02_idler_wheel_2.png]]
 

Latest revision as of 01:10, 10 September 2016

V-wheel assembly

EShapeOko assembly step 01 V-wheel 1.png

Item Part Number Part Description Count
For each wheel
1 MW1 V-wheel sleeve 1
2 G5 5 × 16 × 5 mm bearing 2
3 W5Pa 5 mm precision washer 1

Lay one bearing on a flat surface. Push a V-wheel sleeve over it. The parts are designed to force-fit, so push firmly straight down. Thread this on a long M5 bolt, bearing side first, followed by a precision washer and the second bearing. Place the second bearing on a flat surface, and push the V-wheel sleeve over it too. Make sure both bearings are in as far as they will go. Remove the bolt.

If the V-wheel does not rotate smoothly, see Troubleshooting.

EShapeOko assembly step 01 V-wheel 2.png

Smooth belt idler wheel assembly

EShapeOko assembly step 02 idler wheel 1.png

Item Part Number Part Description Count
For each wheel
1 MW2 Smooth idler wheel sleeve 1
2 G5 5 × 16 × 5 mm bearing 2
3 W5Pa 5 mm precision washer 1

Lay one bearing on a flat surface. Push an idler wheel sleeve over it (lip up, of course). The parts are designed to force-fit, so push firmly straight down. Thread this on a long M5 bolt, lip side first, followed by a precision washer and the second bearing. Place the second bearing on a flat surface, and push the idler wheel sleeve over it too. Make sure the bearings are all the way in, with the first bearing resting against the lip of the sleeve. Remove the bolt.

If the idler wheel does not rotate smoothly, see Troubleshooting.

EShapeOko assembly step 02 idler wheel 2.png

Troubleshooting

If the V-wheel or idler wheel does not rotate smoothly when mounted on a bolt and tightened, it is very likely that a washer (or the internal shim washer) is rubbing against a bearing shield.

To prevent the outer washers from rubbing, always install them with the convex face toward the bearing, and the concave or flat face away from it.

If it's the old-style internal washer that's rubbing against the shields of the bearings, or the outer shield protrudes too much and rubs even against the convex face of a washer, disassemble the V-wheel and examine the bearings carefully. Of the two shields on each bearing, identify the one that is recessed the least, and remove it. Install the bearings with the open side toward the middle of the V-wheel; the shields aren't needed inside the V-wheel. This should eliminate the possibility of the shim washer rubbing against the bearing seal or shield.

With 625-2RS bearings (the ones with rubber seals), removing one seal is the best option. If you have 625ZZ bearings (the ones with metal shields), you can also remove one shield, or you can try to gently push the shields in, to deform them just enough that they no longer touch the washers. Don't overdo it, or the shields will touch the innards of the bearing (the ball cage) and make things worse.

Note that the above information pertains only to the old internal washers. The new precision washers are purposely made with an outer diameter small enough not to rub against a bearing shield or seal, so the need to remove or bend shields should not arise. The new washers are also much more precisely manufactured.

If the wheel makes a crunching noise when turning, you may have encountered a defective bearing.